CASE REPORT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 77-82

Harvesting human skin allografts for burn care in a developing country


1 Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
2 Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State; Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. A O Iyun
Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Pincode: 200212
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njps.njps_13_20

Rights and Permissions

The usage of fresh and glycerolized preserved human skin allograft in burn care is a challenge in a developing countries despites it’s benefits in improving morbidity and mortalities in burn patients. We present two case reports to demonstrates it’s usage. In our first case report, the skin harvested allograft was from a consented patient who was undergoing abdominoplasty. It was harvested as a full thickness skin graft from the panniculus. The harvested skin allograft underwent process of glycerolisation and was stored in 85% glycerol in a fridge at 4°C. The skin allografts were used on the donor site of a patient with 51 percent burns undergoing burn wound excision and skin grafting. The skin was secured with sutures and adherence of the skin allograft on the donor site was noted on the wound review on the third day. Evidence of rejection of some parts of the skin allograft (sloughing off of the skin) was noted by the 7th day post-surgery. The second case report, a two-year-old girl who presented with 37% total burn surface area predominantly deep dermal flame burn injury with suspected inhalation injury. She had tangential wound excision and split thickness skin grafting with both autograft and living donor allograft (donor was the mother). The donor was screened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) I and II, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). The autografts were meshed 6:1. Allografts were previously harvested from the thigh of the mother on the same day using a power dermatome and meshed 3:1. By the 12th day, there was a 60% loss of the allograft on the left thigh while there was 5% graft loss for the autograft. On the right thigh, there was a 50% graft loss for the allograft while there was a 2% graft loss for the autograft. Human Skin allograft can be used as an option for wound coverage in patients who have sustained burns.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1011    
    Printed28    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded60    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal